A great group of designers, engineers and creative thinkers with a wide variety of skills and experience came together to hack the boundaries of physical and cyber reality at the Make Me++ Hackathon. Their challenge was to create new applications for wearable devices, sensors, and the emerging “Internet of Things.”
 

We were inspired by the innovative projects that the eleven hackathon teams developed and prototyped over a short span of two days. These projects explored and highlighted the contemporary potential of Bill Mitchell's ideas from Me++: The Cyborg Self and The Networked City.


The teams worked with an awesome toolbox containing micro-controllers, sensors that sense bio signals and environmental changes, and other raw materials, sponsored by our generous partners at Intel and FormLabs. 

 


ORGANIZERS

 
 

Sole2Soul, a team of MIT students who designed an interface that allows residents to communicate with a city and with each other through the soles of their shoes won the Bill Mitchell Design Award. The innovative project, which judges praised for its extraordinary potential, beat ten other teams to win the $3,000 top prize of the Make Me++ Hackathon.

The other four teams in the final round of the competition were HealthMet, who built an enhanced bike helmet that uses cyclists’ gestures to signal turns; DanceMedia, who that designed an light-studded vest that can visualize a dancer’s weight shifts for her students or dance partner; Pulse++, who designed a sensor-based clock that spins in response to changes in urban traffic; and Waavy, who created a system that turns wearers’ music devices into portable hyperlocal radio broadcasts. These teams won $2000, $1000, $600 and $400 respectively. 

 

Sole2Soul an interface that allows residents to communicate with a city and with each other through the soles of their shoes


 
 
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HealthMet an enhanced bike helmet that uses cyclists’ gestures to signal turns.

 
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DanceMedia, a light-studded vest that can visualize a dancer’s weight shifts for her students or dance partner.

 
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Pulse++, a sensor-based clock that spins in response to changes in urban traffic.

 
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Waavy,  a system that turns wearers’ music devices into portable hyperlocal radio broadcasts.

 
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Intrigger, a social conversation trigger that relates body vitals to body fatigue and personal activity.

 
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Okwu, a network of terminals around the city, which can be used to gather data to sense a city's opinion.

 
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Heatraxx uses sensors to detect heat exhaustion to address the problem of heat stroke and exhaustion amongst athletes.

 

 
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Mirrorsoul is a system that acquires data from your body and represents it as a tangible 3D object.

 

 
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Stickers++, are tiny bluetooth stickers that make the information generated in the physical world more visible and more integrated with everyday objects.

 
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Geode, a network of programmable beacons around the city using which people can upload content on a message board.

 

 

William J. Mitchell (1944 - 2010) was a visionary architect, brilliant design thinker, and writer, and the former dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning. As the Director of the Smart Cities research group at the MIT Media Lab he developed projects, innovations, and concepts that critically questioned the conventional notions of urban design, and worked on disruptive ideas on sustainable cities and innovative media experiences to improve people’s life. 


This hackathon is inspired by Bill Mitchell's book Me++: The Cyborg Self and the Networked City, so start thinking about ways in which you can bring his ideas to your projects. 

Here are a few links that might be helpful in understanding Bill Mitchell's work.


MIT Video : Me++: The Cyborg Self and the Networked City
MIT Press: Bill Mitchell's Books
Book: Connected Sustainable Cities by Bill Mitchell and Federico Casalegno 

 

 

Jury

Neri Oxman Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, MIT Media Lab

Neri Oxman
Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, MIT Media Lab

Daniel Cardoso Llach   Assistant Professor,  Department of Architecture, Pennsylvania State University 

Daniel Cardoso Llach  
Assistant Professor, 
Department of Architecture, Pennsylvania State University 

Sotirios Kotsopoulos Research Associate, MIT Mobile Experience Lab  

Sotirios Kotsopoulos
Research Associate,
MIT Mobile Experience Lab  

Onur Yuce Gun PhD Student, Computation Group, MIT

Onur Yuce Gun
PhD Student,
Computation Group, MIT

Ryan Chin Research Associate, MIT Media Lab

Ryan Chin
Research Associate,
MIT Media Lab

Federico Casalegno Associate Professor of the Practice, MIT Mobile Experience Lab  

Federico Casalegno
Associate Professor of the Practice,
MIT Mobile Experience Lab  


MENTORS

Nicholas Wallen Senior Interaction Designer, Quanttus

Nicholas Wallen
Senior Interaction Designer, Quanttus

Cagri Hakan Zaman Research Assistant,  Mobile Experience Lab

Cagri Hakan Zaman
Research Assistant, 
Mobile Experience Lab

Guillermo Bernal Physical Computing Designer,  Mobile Experience Lab

Guillermo Bernal
Physical Computing Designer, 
Mobile Experience Lab

Yihyun Lim Researcher, Architecture Designer, Mobile Experience Lab

Yihyun Lim
Researcher, Architecture Designer, Mobile Experience Lab

Steve Pomeroy Senior Software Engineer,  Levelup

Steve Pomeroy
Senior Software Engineer, 
Levelup

Ananya Mukherjee Interaction Designer, Mobile Experience Lab

Ananya Mukherjee
Interaction Designer,
Mobile Experience Lab


TEAM

Anika Gupta Researcher,  Mobile Experience Lab

Anika Gupta
Researcher, 
Mobile Experience Lab

Giada Mattern Administrator, Mobile Experience Lab

Giada Mattern
Administrator,
Mobile Experience Lab

Blanca Abramek Researcher, Architecture Designer, Mobile Experience Lab

Blanca Abramek
Researcher, Architecture Designer, Mobile Experience Lab

Beyza Sahin Researcher,  Mobile Experience Lab

Beyza Sahin
Researcher, 
Mobile Experience Lab

Suruchi Dumpawar Researcher, Mobile Experience Lab

Suruchi Dumpawar
Researcher,
Mobile Experience Lab


 
 

The Intel® Edison development board empowers the next generation of small devices—including wearables, robotics, and IoT—all on a module the size of a stamp.

 
 

Intel Galileo is an open source, Arduino*-compatible platform that enables makers, teachers, and everyone in between, to quickly and easily bring their prototypes to life.

 

SENSORS

Ear-clip Heart Rate Sensor
GSR Sensor
 Sound Sensor
Capacitive Touch Sensor 
 Rotary Angle Sensor
10 DOF IMU
Temperature Sensor Light Sensor 
Infrared Thermopile Sensor
UV Light Sensor 
Visible Light Sensor
Loudness Sensor

 

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS

NFC Stickers
NFC Module
DIY Sensor Film Kit
Soft Potentiometer
Electret Microphone Amplifier
Breadboard PCB
Half-size Breadboard
Lithium Ion Polymer Battery
SMT Right Angle Breakout Board
JST 2-pin cable
Headers
Cables
9V to Barrel Jack Adapters
Smart Relay
SD/MicroSD Memory Card

ACTUATORS

Flexible LED strips
DIP LED Blue-Blue 
DIP LED Green-Green
DIP LED Red-Red 
Mini ServoLCD RGB Backlights 
Buzzer 
Button 


SPONSORS